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Cover page of the Journal of Health Sciences


 
 Table of Contents  
SHORT COMMUNICATION
Year : 2020  |  Volume : 13  |  Issue : 3  |  Page : 254-255

Envisaging capacity building among faculty members to ensure successful implementation of integrated teaching in medical colleges


1 Member of the Medical Education Unit and Institute Research Council, Department of Community Medicine, Shri Sathya Sai Medical College and Research Institute, Sri Balaji Vidyapeeth – Deemed to be University, Ammapettai, Nellikuppam, Chengalpet District, Tamil Nadu, India
2 Department of Community Medicine, Shri Sathya Sai Medical College and Research Institute, Sri Balaji Vidyapeeth – Deemed to be University, Ammapettai, Nellikuppam, Chengalpet District, Tamil Nadu, India

Date of Submission20-Feb-2020
Date of Acceptance30-Apr-2020
Date of Web Publication05-Oct-2020

Correspondence Address:
Dr. Saurabh RamBihariLal Shrivastava
Professor, Department of Community Medicine, Shri Sathya Sai Medical College and Research Institute, Sri Balaji Vidyapeeth (SBV) – Deemed to be University, Tiruporur - Guduvancherry Main Road, Ammapettai, Nellikuppam, Chengalpet District- 603108, Tamil Nadu
India
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/kleuhsj.kleuhsj_44_20

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  Abstract 

Integrated teaching in the field of medical education has been looked upon as the key approach to deliver complex information to the medical students in a relatively easier manner. In order to address the existing lacunae in the traditional curriculum with regard to integrated teaching, specific provisions in terms of various levels, topics and nature of integration, has been clearly specified in the recently implemented competency-based curriculum for undergraduate students. The successful implementation of the integrated teaching program across all the phases will essentially require support from all the concerned stakeholders, especially the management, administration, curriculum committee, medical education unit, alignment & integration teams, and faculty members. Considering that implementation of integrated teaching needs to be done within the available human resources, it becomes quite obvious that we have to focus towards capacity building. In conclusion, the process of implementation of integrated teaching in any of the medical colleges across India is a challenging task. However, the overall process can be simplified and made effective through active faculty involvement and support from the administration.

Keywords: India, integrated teaching, medical education


How to cite this article:
Shrivastava SR, Shrivastava PS. Envisaging capacity building among faculty members to ensure successful implementation of integrated teaching in medical colleges. Indian J Health Sci Biomed Res 2020;13:254-5

How to cite this URL:
Shrivastava SR, Shrivastava PS. Envisaging capacity building among faculty members to ensure successful implementation of integrated teaching in medical colleges. Indian J Health Sci Biomed Res [serial online] 2020 [cited 2020 Dec 2];13:254-5. Available from: https://www.ijournalhs.org/text.asp?2020/13/3/254/297197


  Introduction Top


Integrated teaching in the field of medical education has been looked upon as the key approach to deliver complex information to the medical students in a relatively easier manner, wherein they can understand the relationship between the theoretical knowledge and practical application of the same in clinical practice.[1] In fact, integrated teaching helps the students to understand the various ways in which subjects are related to each other and what all to focus upon in any topic to become a competent healthcare professional. Such an approach of teaching also envisages the significance and value of a multisectoral team in imparting health care.[1]

Implementing integrated teaching

To address the existing lacunae in the traditional curriculum with regard to integrated teaching, specific provisions in terms of various levels, topics, and nature (horizontal or vertical) of integration have been clearly specified in the recently implemented competencybased curriculum for undergraduate students. Even though it has been explicitly specified, the real challenge lies in its successful implementation, wherein success means beneficial to the students in their path to become a competent medical graduate and at the same time ensuring elimination of the unnecessary duplication and wastage of time.[2],[3],[4]

Role of capacity building

The successful implementation of the integrated teaching program across all the phases will essentially require support from all the concerned stakeholders, especially the management, administration, curriculum committee, medical education unit, alignment and integration teams, and faculty members.[1],[3],[4] Considering that implementation of integrated teaching needs to be done within the available human resources (viz., no rise in the number of faculty members per department proposed), it becomes quite obvious that we have to focus toward capacity building (by sensitizing them about the intricacies of integrated teaching with the help of various sensitization programs organized by the Medical Education Unit).[5]

The ultimate aim of these capacity building initiatives is that after the training, they start functioning effectively for the successful implementation of the program on their own and also pass on the gained knowledge to other departmental colleagues.[2],[3] These trained faculty members can work as change agent and play an important role in reducing the opposition from other colleagues who might be reluctant to change. At the same time, such sessions should be organized periodically with an aim to sensitize and train all the faculty members.[1],[2],[3] At Shri Sathya Sai Medical College and Research Institute, a constituent unit of Sri Balaji Vidyapeeth, Puducherry, the members of the Medical Education Unit have acknowledged the need to make the faculty members understand about the scope and utility of integrated teaching in producing a competent medical professional. Accordingly, a series of faculty development program sessions have been organized for the benefit of the teaching staff and special efforts have been taken to make them participate in designing an integrated teaching time table. Further, measures have to be taken to retain the trained staff and help them in coordinating the entire process between different departments.

Need to make Working Team

Each of the medical colleges should identify the working group of faculty members and they should be the driving force not only for identifying the learning outcomes of a session or devising the integrated lesson plan, but also to create more interest among the medical students so that their overall participation improves.[3],[4],[5] At the same time, a comprehensive timetable needs to be prepared and different types of teaching–learning methods should be used to ensure that integrated teaching sessions are conducted effectively.[3],[4],[5]

Assessment and Evaluation

In addition, the assessment pattern needs to be set and explained to the students well in advance so that they can prepare themselves.[2],[4] Moreover, the students should be provided with a logbook to document their learning during each session. It is quite obvious that the entire process of implementation will be a resourceintensive program and thus has to be supported financially, especially in terms of infrastructure support or establishment of learning management system. Further, the entire process has to be periodically evaluated by obtaining feedback from the students and faculty members to enable modifications in the delivery of the program.[2],[3],[4],[5]


  Conclusion Top


In conclusion, the process of implementation of integrated teaching in any of the medical colleges across India is a challenging task. However, the overall process can be simplified and made effective through active faculty involvement and support from the administration.

Financial support and sponsorship

Nil.

Conflicts of interest

There are no conflicts of interest.

 
  References Top

1.
Vashe A, Devi V, Rao R, Abraham RR, Pallath V, Umakanth S. Using an integrated teaching approach to facilitate student achievement of the learning outcomes in a preclinical medical curriculum in India. Adv Physiol Educ 2019;43:522-8.  Back to cited text no. 1
    
2.
Young T, Rohwer A, van Schalkwyk S, Volmink J, Clarke M. Patience, persistence and pragmatism: Experiences and lessons learnt from the implementation of clinically integrated teaching and learning of evidence-based health care – A qualitative study. PLoS One 2015;10:e0131121.  Back to cited text no. 2
    
3.
Shrivastava SR, Shrivastava PS. Role of curriculum committee in the planning, implementation and evaluation of integrated teaching in medical education in India. Indian J Health Sci Biomed Res 2019;12:179-80.  Back to cited text no. 3
  [Full text]  
4.
Bhardwaj P, Bhardwaj N, Mahdi F, Srivastava JP, Gupta U. Integrated teaching program using case-based learning. Int J Appl Basic Med Res 2015;5:S24-8.  Back to cited text no. 4
    
5.
Shrivastava SR, Shrivastava PS. Development of a module for the implementation of integrated teaching in a medical college in India. J Integr Health Sci 2018;6:77-8.  Back to cited text no. 5
  [Full text]  




 

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