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Cover page of the Journal of Health Sciences


 
 Table of Contents  
SHORT COMMUNICATION
Year : 2020  |  Volume : 13  |  Issue : 2  |  Page : 167-168

Medical professionals: Need and role of professionalism


1 Member of the Medical Education Unit and Institute Research Council, Department of Community Medicine, Shri Sathya Sai Medical College and Research Institute, Sri Balaji Vidyapeeth – Deemed to be University, Ammapettai, Nellikuppam, Chengalpet District, Tamil Nadu, India
2 Department of Community Medicine, Shri Sathya Sai Medical College and Research Institute, Sri Balaji Vidyapeeth – Deemed to be University, Ammapettai, Nellikuppam, Chengalpet District, Tamil Nadu, India

Date of Submission26-Oct-2019
Date of Acceptance19-Feb-2020
Date of Web Publication23-Jun-2020

Correspondence Address:
Dr. Saurabh RamBihariLal Shrivastava
Department of Community Medicine, Shri Sathya Sai Medical College and Research Institute, Sri Balaji Vidyapeeth (SBV) – Deemed to be University, Tiruporur - Guduvancherry Main Road, Ammapettai, Nellikuppam, Chengalpet District- 603108, Tamil Nadu
India
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/kleuhsj.kleuhsj_283_19

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  Abstract 


In the field of health and patient care, no more doctors are acknowledged as healers and this has resulted predominantly because the current breed of doctors has fallen short in sustaining the high standards set by the earlier generation of doctors. If we introspect, it is us only who have to be blamed for the current trends and keeping all these facts into account, there is an urgent need to take steps to resurrect the images of doctors in the eyes of the community. It is a fact that present day students' enters the course without any priming and have limited knowledge about morals and values. The need of the hour is to adopt a combination of teaching-learning methods in a longitudinal manner to teach professional values to students in all the years of course. In conclusion, professionalism is a core competency for all the medical graduates and special attention and efforts should be taken to ensure that all students acquire the desired traits during the duration of their course and are ready and well-equipped to deal with the challenges of the medical field.

Keywords: Curriculum, medical education, professionalism, students


How to cite this article:
Shrivastava SR, Shrivastava PS. Medical professionals: Need and role of professionalism. Indian J Health Sci Biomed Res 2020;13:167-8

How to cite this URL:
Shrivastava SR, Shrivastava PS. Medical professionals: Need and role of professionalism. Indian J Health Sci Biomed Res [serial online] 2020 [cited 2020 Aug 11];13:167-8. Available from: http://www.ijournalhs.org/text.asp?2020/13/2/167/287416




  Introduction Top


In the field of health and patient care, no more doctors are acknowledged as healers and this has resulted predominantly because the current breed of doctors has fallen short in sustaining the high standards set by the earlier generation of doctors.[1] It would not be wrong to say that many doctors have become unprofessional by criticizing the decision of each other's and are looked upon as moneyminded people owing to the cutpractice. This has not been further helped by the involvement of media, including the social media, wherein even the minutest of the mistakes have been highlighted and projected, as a result of which the image of the doctor community has been tarnished.[1],[2]

Consequences of unprofessional behavior

The consequences of the same are for everyone to see with a significant rise in the incidence of assaults against doctors and lack of trust among the general population toward the entire doctor community. Each and every action of ours has been looked upon as questionable and has raised eyebrows, even if the line of management has been genuine.[3] Further, the doctors have lost the respect which they use to have from their team members, especially because of the unethical actions of some of the doctors. However, the biggest consequence and challenge have been the lack of belief in modern medicine and resorting to traditional healers and thus rise in the number of quacks.[2],[3]

Strategies to improve professional behavior

If we introspect, it is us only who have to be blamed for the current trends and keeping all these facts into account, and there is an urgent need to take steps to resurrect the images of doctors in the eyes of the community. It is a fact that presentday students' enter the course without any priming, at times due to the compulsion by parents and have limited knowledge about morals and values.[2],[4] They have the primary intention to just pass the examinations, while the other essential components (viz. communication skills, altruism, honesty, etc.) remain unattended. The introduction of the foundation course in the curriculum is a thoughtful attempt to deal with the prevailing challenges.[1],[3]

As it has been advocated that in order to bring about any change in society, we have to take measures to ensure reforms in the education delivery and in our case medical education.[4] Professionalism was earlier considered to be an implied character of a medical graduate, and it was taught under a hidden curriculum, nevertheless keeping the current situation in mind, it has to be addressed explicitly and should be detailed in the curriculum across all professional years.[4],[5] The need of the hour is to adopt a combination of teachinglearning methods in a longitudinal manner to teach professional values to students in all the years of course.[1],[4]

The Medical Council of India took an important step by introducing the competencybased undergraduate curriculum for the undergraduates, and the decision to implement the same was also driven by the fact that the traditional curriculum has failed to address the component of professionalism.[5] Accordingly, Sri Balaji Vidyapeeth and its two constituent colleges - Shri Sathya Sai Medical College and Research Institute and Mahatma Gandhi College and Research Institute have introduced curricular reforms to impart teaching of professionalism and also assess the undergraduate students (like in Exit Objective Structured Clinical Examination for Interns).

A professional graduate will not only make good and evidencebased decisions for patient care, but will be more responsible, more confident to deal with the challenges of Googleequipped patients, and play an important role in reducing the medical errors, adverse outcomes, malpractices, or avoid incidents of abuse resulting due to communication gaps.[3],[5]


  Conclusion Top


In conclusion, professionalism is a core competency for all the medical graduates, and special attention and efforts should be taken to ensure that all students acquire the desired traits during the duration of their course and are ready and wellequipped to deal with the challenges of the medical field.

Financial support and sponsorship

Nil.

Conflicts of interest

There are no conflicts of interest.



 
  References Top

1.
Shrivastava SR, Shrivastava PS. Targeting unprofessionalism among medical students in Indian settings. South East Asian J Med Educ 2019;13:55-6.  Back to cited text no. 1
    
2.
Kim DK. Medical professionalism in neoliberalism. J Korean Med Sci 2019;34:e125.  Back to cited text no. 2
    
3.
Slattery D. Medical professionalism, critical for good practice and clinician wellbeing. Ir Med J 2019;112:929.  Back to cited text no. 3
    
4.
Seif-Farshad M, Bazmi S, Amiri F, Fattahi F, Kiani M. Knowledge of medical professionalism in medical students and physicians at Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences and affiliated hospitals-Iran. Medicine (Baltimore) 2016;95:e5380.  Back to cited text no. 4
    
5.
Shrivastava SR, Shrivastava PS. Teaching professionalism and leadership skills to an Indian Medical Graduate. CHRISMED J Health Res 2019;6:112-3.  Back to cited text no. 5
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