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Cover page of the Journal of Health Sciences


 
 Table of Contents  
LETTER TO EDITOR
Year : 2020  |  Volume : 13  |  Issue : 1  |  Page : 59-60

Ensuring adoption of healthy lifestyles to minimize the risk of development of dementia


1 Vice-Principal Curriculum, Member of the Medical Education Unit and Institute Research Council, Department of Community Medicine, Shri Sathya Sai Medical College and Research Institute, Sri Balaji Vidyapeeth Deemed to be University, Ammapettai, Nellikuppam, Chengalpattu, Tamil Nadu, India
2 Department of Community Medicine, Shri Sathya Sai Medical College and Research Institute, Sri Balaji Vidyapeeth Deemed to be University, Ammapettai, Nellikuppam, Chengalpattu, Tamil Nadu, India

Date of Submission18-May-2019
Date of Acceptance23-Sep-2019
Date of Web Publication23-Jan-2020

Correspondence Address:
Dr. Saurabh RamBihariLal Shrivastava
Department of Community Medicine, Shri Sathya Sai Medical College and Research Institute, Sri Balaji Vidyapeeth (SBV), Deemed to be University, Tiruporur, Guduvancherry Main Road, Ammapettai, Nellikuppam, Chengalpattu - 603 108, Tamil Nadu
India
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/kleuhsj.kleuhsj_101_19

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How to cite this article:
Shrivastava SR, Shrivastava PS. Ensuring adoption of healthy lifestyles to minimize the risk of development of dementia. Indian J Health Sci Biomed Res 2020;13:59-60

How to cite this URL:
Shrivastava SR, Shrivastava PS. Ensuring adoption of healthy lifestyles to minimize the risk of development of dementia. Indian J Health Sci Biomed Res [serial online] 2020 [cited 2020 Jul 8];13:59-60. Available from: http://www.ijournalhs.org/text.asp?2020/13/1/59/276414



Dear Editor,

Dementia has been regarded as one of the major global public health problems, which is growing at a very fast pace.[1] The global estimates depict that close to 50 million people are suffering from the condition at present, and if no prompt measures are taken, it is expected to triple by 2050.[1],[2] Furthermore, it has been observed that each year, 10 million people are added to the pool, and under any circumstances, these are alarming numbers.[2] Further, it has been reported that six out of ten people suffering from the condition are from the low- and middle-income nations, which further highlights lack of prioritization of the issue in the eyes of policy-makers, minimal investment, and an absence of targeted interventions.[1],[2]

It is vital to understand that this condition plays an important role in a significant rise in the involved costs for the individual, family, community, and the public health sector.[1],[2] At the same time, it becomes an important cause of disability and dependency among people in the elderly age group.[2] Even though age is the crucial determinant of condition, a large number of lifestyle-related parameters (viz., physical inactivity, tobacco use, unhealthy diets, and harmful use of alcohol) also attribute to the condition.[3] Furthermore, a range of chronic diseases such as diabetes or hypertension also significantly enhances the risk of development of the disease.[3],[4]

Acknowledging the magnitude of the disease, universal distribution, and long-term consequences, it is high time to implement targeted interventions to either delay or arrest the development of the condition.[3] However, from the prevention and control perspective, there is a definite scope to target all the potential risk factors, and this will definitely require support from all the involved stakeholders.[4] There is an immense need to provide knowledge to the healthcare professionals so that they are well equipped to deal with the problem of dementia.[5] This will simultaneously also help the policy-makers to design comprehensive policies that can healthy encourage lifestyles.[3]

To bridge the existing gap and empower the health professionals, a set of recent guidelines have been released by the World Health Organization and special emphasis has been given to the lifestyle factors.[3] Overall, physical activity has been recommended for adults with normal cognition as well as those with mild cognitive impairment to minimize the risk of cognitive decline.[3] On similar lines, measures for tobacco cessation or decreasing harmful drinking, consumption of a healthy balanced diet, and weight management have been advocated to minimize the decline in the cognition.[3],[4],[5] In continuation, optimal management of hypertension, diabetes, and dyslipidemia has also been envisaged by the international welfare agencies.[3],[4],[5]

However, it is vital to understand that mere addressing risk factors will not achieve sustainable results unless it is well supported by the strengthening of information systems, improvement in the diagnosis, therapy and care, rehabilitation of the affected persons, and investment in research activities.[1],[2] Moreover, special attention toward be given for the awareness activities and it has to be explained to the general population about the condition and the need for an early intervention to facilitate the early detection and treatment.[1],[5]

In conclusion, dementia is an important public health concern, essentially requiring the strengthening of healthier lifestyles and a multisectoral support for accomplishing a reduction in the burden of the disease in the future.

Financial support and sponsorship

Nil.

Conflicts of interest

There are no conflicts of interest.



 
  References Top

1.
Shrivastava SR, Shrivastava PS, Ramasamy J. Rising global estimates of dementia: An urgent public health need to stem the tide. Ann Trop Med Public Health 2017;10:741-2.  Back to cited text no. 1
  [Full text]  
2.
World Health Organization. Adopting a Healthy Lifestyle Helps Reduce the Risk of Dementia. World Health Organization; 2019. Available from: https://www.who.int/news-room/detail/14-05-2019- adopting-a-healthy-lifestyle-helps-reduce-the-risk-of- dementia. [Last accessed on 2019 May 18].  Back to cited text no. 2
    
3.
Ashby-Mitchell K, Burns R, Anstey KJ. The proportion of dementia attributable to common modifiable lifestyle factors in Barbados. Rev Panam Salud Publica 2018;42:e17.  Back to cited text no. 3
    
4.
World Health Organization. Risk Reduction of Cognitive Decline and Dementia – WHO Guidelines. Geneva: World Health Organization Press; 2019. p. 1-12.  Back to cited text no. 4
    
5.
Lee Y. Primary prevention of dementia: The future of population-based multidomain lifestyle interventions. J Prev Alzheimers Dis 2018;5:5-7.  Back to cited text no. 5
    




 

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