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Cover page of the Journal of Health Sciences


 
 Table of Contents  
LETTER TO EDITOR
Year : 2019  |  Volume : 12  |  Issue : 3  |  Page : 266

Is metabolic syndrome truly prevailing among 1st-year medical students of a medical college in North Karnataka, India?


Department of Paediatrics, Al-Kindy College of Medicine, University of Baghdad, Baghdad, Iraq

Date of Web Publication15-Oct-2019

Correspondence Address:
Prof. Mahmood Dhahir Al-Mendalawi
P. O. Box 55302, Baghdad Post Office, Baghdad
Iraq
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/kleuhsj.kleuhsj_153_19

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How to cite this article:
Al-Mendalawi MD. Is metabolic syndrome truly prevailing among 1st-year medical students of a medical college in North Karnataka, India?. Indian J Health Sci Biomed Res 2019;12:266

How to cite this URL:
Al-Mendalawi MD. Is metabolic syndrome truly prevailing among 1st-year medical students of a medical college in North Karnataka, India?. Indian J Health Sci Biomed Res [serial online] 2019 [cited 2019 Nov 21];12:266. Available from: http://www.ijournalhs.org/text.asp?2019/12/3/266/269194



Dear Editor,

I read the distinguished study by Teli et al.[1] published in May–August 2019 issue of the Indian J Health Sci Biomed Res. They determined the prevalence of metabolic syndrome (MS) among healthy Indian medical students and compared the prevalence between both genders. They found that the MS prevalence was 10.83% among the studied students with 9.4% in males and 11.94% in females. However, the difference between genders was not statistically significant (P = 0.66). At least one risk factor for developing MS was noticed in 76.6% of the students. The prevalence of individual components for MS was abdominal obesity (59.17%), raised serum triglyceride (2.50%), reduced serum high-density lipoprotein (HDL) (38.33%), raised blood pressure (BP) (systolic BP [SBP] – 20.83% and diastolic BP – 28.33%), and raised blood glucose (5.83%). In terms of gender analysis, 46.27% of females and 28.30% of males had lower HDL values (P = 0.04). Moreover, SBP was higher in 37.74% of males compared to 7.46% of females (P = 0.0001).[1] I assume that the above-mentioned results must be cautiously interpreted. The authors addressed one study limitation related to the small sample size (n = 120).[1] I assume that the following methodological limitations might additionally cast suspicions on the study results. In the methodology, the authors mentioned that the MS parameters were recorded according to the guidelines of the International Diabetes Federation (IDF). There are certain concerns on the precision of the IDF tool to diagnose MS. It is explicit that there are many definition criteria for MS, notably IDF, National Cholesterol Education Program Adult Treatment Panel III (ATPIII), and the American Heart Association (AHA). Assessment of these three criteria showed that the MS prevalence was significantly estimated greater on employing IDF and AHA definitions as compared to the ATPIII definition and that IDF and AHA definitions were found more sensitive than that of ATPIII definition in diagnosing MS.[2] Moreover, the IDF criteria employed in the study by Teli et al.[1] is old dated back to 2006 and it is no more worthy.[3] With the construction of the new diagnostic MS criteria in the Indian population that has been launched in 2016,[4] I assume that conducting a large-scale study employing Indian MS criteria could yield a better idea on the prevalence of MS among medical students and related risk factors.

Financial support and sponsorship

Nil.

Conflicts of interest

There are no conflicts of interest.



 
  References Top

1.
Teli A, Jabannavar V, Adorno I, Gayatri GS, Lampis F, Patil P. Estimation of prevalence of metabolic syndrome among 1st year medical students of a medical college in North Karnataka, India. Indian J Health Sci Biomed Res 2019;12:174-8.  Back to cited text no. 1
  [Full text]  
2.
Mancia G, Bombelli M, Facchetti R, Casati A, Ronchi I, Quarti-Trevano F, et al. Impact of different definitions of the metabolic syndrome on the prevalence of organ damage, cardiometabolic risk and cardiovascular events. J Hypertens 2010;28:999-1006.  Back to cited text no. 2
    
3.
Alberti KG, Zimmet P, Shaw J. Metabolic syndrome – A new world-wide definition. A Consensus statement from the international diabetes federation. Diabet Med 2006;23:469-80.  Back to cited text no. 3
    
4.
Mohanan PP. Metabolic syndrome in the Indian population: Public health implications. Hypertens J 2016;2:1-6.  Back to cited text no. 4
    




 

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