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Cover page of the Journal of Health Sciences


 
 Table of Contents  
MEDICAL EDUCATION
Year : 2019  |  Volume : 12  |  Issue : 3  |  Page : 262-263

Competency-based medical education and its need in the delivery of medical education in India


1 Vice-Principal Curriculum, Member of the Medical Education Unit and Institute Research Council, Department of Community Medicine, Shri Sathya Sai Medical College and Research Institute, Sri Balaji Vidyapeeth – Deemed to be University, Ammapettai, Nellikuppam, Chengalpet, Kancheepuram, Tamil Nadu, India
2 Department of Community Medicine, Shri Sathya Sai Medical College and Research Institute, Sri Balaji Vidyapeeth – Deemed to be University, Ammapettai, Nellikuppam, Chengalpet, Kancheepuram, Tamil Nadu, India

Date of Web Publication15-Oct-2019

Correspondence Address:
Dr. Saurabh RamBihariLal Shrivastava
Associate Professor, Department of Community Medicine, Shri Sathya Sai Medical College and Research Institute, Sri Balaji Vidyapeeth (SBV) – Deemed to be University, Tiruporur - Guduvancherry Main Road, Ammapettai, Nellikuppam, Chengalpet, Kancheepuram, Tamil Nadu - 603 108
India
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/kleuhsj.kleuhsj_10_19

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How to cite this article:
Shrivastava SR, Shrivastava PS. Competency-based medical education and its need in the delivery of medical education in India. Indian J Health Sci Biomed Res 2019;12:262-3

How to cite this URL:
Shrivastava SR, Shrivastava PS. Competency-based medical education and its need in the delivery of medical education in India. Indian J Health Sci Biomed Res [serial online] 2019 [cited 2019 Nov 19];12:262-3. Available from: http://www.ijournalhs.org/text.asp?2019/12/3/262/269190



Sir,

Competency-based medical education (CBME) is an outcome-oriented approach for the delivery of medical education, wherein the competencies expected of a medical student (undergraduate or postgraduate) are defined well in advance.[1] The entire process is often termed as a reverse planning model, as the educators/administrators work in the reverse direction.[1] For instance, to accomplish a specific competency in a medical student, specific information pertaining to the topics to be covered, set objectives, adopted teachinglearning method and methods for assessment, so that at the end of the course the student can be competent.[1],[2]

It is important to introspect the need for the transition from traditional approach to CBME approach?[2],[3] The answer to the same can be explained by the fact that over the years, the health needs of the community are quite varied, and in order to address these needs, the health personnel have to proportionately upgrade and expand their skills.[2],[3],[4] In the existing medical education teaching system, the quality of a budding doctor is determined by the education approach and strategies adopted within the institution.[3],[4] The analysis of the medical education delivery system has identified multiple shortcomings in the existing pattern and it has been realized that in order to produce an Indian medical graduate, significant reforms in the teaching–learning–assessment is the need of the hour.[1],[4] It can also be put forth like we are in the need of students who are socially responsive and adequately equipped in their professional practice.[1]

To supplement and deal with the shortcomings of traditional form of education, CBME is a well-thought and scientific approach, which gives more emphasis on formative assessment, neutralizes subjectivity, and assesses a student based on the predefined criteria.[2],[3],[4],[5] The approach is quite flexible and encourages adoption of innovative teaching–learning methods, with a single aim to make students competent.[3],[4]

Thus, it has been decided by a panel of experts to ensure curricular delivery through competency-based approach within the undergraduation period. In fact, the process has begun across all the medical colleges in the entire nation through sensitization session of all faculty members and curricular implementation support program in a phase-wise manner. However, it is important to realize the challenges associated with the implementation of the curriculum in all the medical colleges.[4],[5],[6] There is an immense need for support from administration, financial support, and strengthening of the infrastructure (viz., skills laboratory and designing of new elective courses).[5],[6] In addition, there is a definite need to have a constant supervision over the entire process and that too across all four phases of undergraduation. Moreover, the support from faculty members is one of the crucial factors as the reform cannot be implemented without their positive response and collaboration.[4],[5],[6]

To conclude, CBME is the ideal solution for meeting the varied needs of the general population in the future in Indian settings, but it definitely requires loads of groundwork and constant direction from the higher authorities for its smooth planning and implementation.

Financial support and sponsorship

Nil.

Conflicts of interest

There are no conflicts of interest.



 
  References Top

1.
Shah N, Desai C, Jorwekar G, Badyal D, Singh T. Competency-based medical education: An overview and application in pharmacology. Indian J Pharmacol 2016;48:S5-9.  Back to cited text no. 1
    
2.
Shrivastava SR, Shrivastava PS. Introducing team based learning within the purview of competency driven curriculum: Points to ponder. MAMC J Med Sci 2018;4:110-1.  Back to cited text no. 2
  [Full text]  
3.
Ferguson PC, Caverzagie KJ, Nousiainen MT, Snell L, ICBME Collaborators. Changing the culture of medical training: An important step toward the implementation of competency-based medical education. Med Teach 2017;39:599-602.  Back to cited text no. 3
    
4.
Shrivastava SR, Shrivastava PS. How to successfully implement competency-based medical education in India. Educ Health Prof 2018;1:61-3.  Back to cited text no. 4
  [Full text]  
5.
Caverzagie KJ, Nousiainen MT, Ferguson PC, Ten Cate O, Ross S, Harris KA, et al. Overarching challenges to the implementation of competency-based medical education. Med Teach 2017;39:588-93.  Back to cited text no. 5
    
6.
Hawkins RE, Welcher CM, Holmboe ES, Kirk LM, Norcini JJ, Simons KB, et al. Implementation of competency-based medical education: Are we addressing the concerns and challenges? Med Educ 2015;49:1086-102.  Back to cited text no. 6
    




 

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