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Cover page of the Journal of Health Sciences


 
 Table of Contents  
ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2017  |  Volume : 10  |  Issue : 1  |  Page : 41-43

Awareness of demand generation schemes among pregnant women in rural area of Belagavi


Department of Community Medicine, Jawaharlal Nehru Medical College, Belagavi, Karnataka, India

Date of Web Publication18-Jan-2017

Correspondence Address:
Dr. Nilesh Narayan Jadhav
Department of Community Medicine, Jawaharlal Nehru Medical College, KLE University, Belagavi - 590 010, Karnataka
India
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/2349-5006.198582

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  Abstract 

Background: Mothers and children are one of the most vulnerable or special risk groups, and the risk for this group is associated with pregnancy, childbirth, and also in postnatal period. A number of demand generation schemes have been launched by the Government of India for the welfare of the pregnant women, but still a significant reduction in maternal mortality and morbidity has not been achieved yet.
Objective: To assess the awareness of various demand generation schemes among pregnant women.
Methodology: A community-based cross-sectional study was done among 540 pregnant women in Primary Health Centre area of Handiganur, Belagavi.
Results: Among 540 study participants, 373 (69.1%) participants knew about Prasuthi Araike, 206 (38.1%) participants knew about Janani Suraksha Yojana, 396 (73.3%) knew about Madilu kit, and only 104 (19.3%) knew about Thayi Bhagya Plus.
Conclusion: The awareness about demand generation schemes is very high, which has successfully promoted women's preference to institutional deliveries.

Keywords: Demand generation schemes, Janani Suraksha Yojana, Madilu kit, rural area, Thayi Bhagya plus


How to cite this article:
Jadhav NN, Shivaswamy M S, Mallapur M D. Awareness of demand generation schemes among pregnant women in rural area of Belagavi. Indian J Health Sci Biomed Res 2017;10:41-3

How to cite this URL:
Jadhav NN, Shivaswamy M S, Mallapur M D. Awareness of demand generation schemes among pregnant women in rural area of Belagavi. Indian J Health Sci Biomed Res [serial online] 2017 [cited 2019 Jul 17];10:41-3. Available from: http://www.ijournalhs.org/text.asp?2017/10/1/41/198582


  Introduction Top


Mothers and children approximately comprise 71.14% of the total population in any developing country being one of the most vulnerable or special risk groups.[1] In India, women of childbearing age (15-45 years) constitute about 32.2% of the total population. The risk for this group is associated with pregnancy, childbirth, and also in the postnatal period. A number of demand generation schemes have been launched by the Government of India for the welfare of the pregnant women, but still a significant reduction in maternal mortality and morbidity has not been achieved yet. The highest maternal mortality ratios can be witnessed in India accounting for approximately 20% of all the maternal deaths globally.[2] Thus, promoting women's health improves not only individual health but also the health of the family, community, and the nation, and women acquire a special place in the community.[1] Knowledge about available schemes can help to avail the benefits of these schemes. Hence, the present study was undertaken to assess the awareness of various demand generation schemes such as Prasuthi Araike, Janani Suraksha Yojana, Madilu kit, and Thayi Bhagya Plus among pregnant women.

Objective

To assess the awareness of various demand generation schemes among pregnant women.


  Methodology Top


This community-based cross-sectional study was done in Primary Health Centre (PHC) area of Handiganur, which is the field practice areas of Department of Community Medicine, Jawaharlal Nehru Medical College, Belagavi. About 540 registered pregnant women during the period from January 1, 2015 to December 31, 2015 in PHC, Handiganur, was included in the study, and married women who have come to mother's place in the study area from other areas for delivery were excluded from the study. Sample size was calculated considering population of 27,000 and crude birth rate of Handiganur (19/1000 MYP). Total sample size estimated to be 513 and corrected sample size was 540. Approval of the Institutional Ethics Committee for Human Subject's Research of the institution was obtained, and data were collected using pretested and predesigned questionnaire after taking informed consent.


  Results Top


Among 540 pregnant women in the present study, the age group ranged from 20 to 35 years and the mean age of the study participants was 24.1 ± 2.8 years. Majority of them 499 (92.4%) were 18 years and above at the age of marriage and only 41 (7.6%) were <18 years. Four hundred and thirty-six (80.7%) women were Hindus, followed by 82 (15.2%) were Muslims and only 22 (4.1%) were Christians. About 480 (88.9%) of them were literates and 292 (54.1%) were homemakers. About 288 (53.3%) study participants belonged to joint family and most (58.5%) of them, i.e., 316 participants belonged to socioeconomic status Class V of modified B. G. Prasad classification.

Out of 540 study participants, irrespective of eligible criteria, 373 (69.1%) participants knew about Prasuthi Araike, 206 (38.1%) participants knew about Janani Suraksha Yojana, 396 (73.3%) knew about Madilu kit, and only 104 (19.3%) knew about Thayi Bhagya Plus [Table 1].
Table 1: Distribution of the study participants according to awareness about demand generation schemes


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Out of 540 study participants, mean ± standard deviation of the knowledge gained by study participants about Demand Generation Schemes from Accredited Social Health Activist (ASHA) worker was 38.3 ± 4.1, from Auxiliary Nurse Midwives (ANM) was 11.7 ± 2.7, from Anganwadi worker (AWW) was 23.3 ± 3.5, from doctors was 7.6 ± 2.2, and from multiple sources was 19.1 ± 3.3, with confidence interval of 95% [Table 2].
Table 2: Distribution of study participants according to knowledge about demand generation schemes given by the health-care worker


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  Discussion Top


In the present study of 540 participants, irrespective of eligible criteria, 69.1% participants knew about Prasuthi Araike, 38.1% participants knew about Janani Suraksha Yojana, 73.3% knew about Madilu kit, and only 19.3% knew about Thayi Bhagya Plus. A study done in Aligarh, Uttar Pradesh[3] in 2016 with 300 participants, showed only 5.3% mothers were unaware of the cash benefit and/or those told to come after some time but could not return back. A study conducted in Uttar Pradesh[4] in 2010 covering 4754 households spread over 12 districts, showed that most of the women, i.e., 88% were aware of the schemes and the incentives, it offered for institutional deliveries. Similarly, a study conducted in Ambala district, Haryana[5] in 2015 with 200 participants, showed that 71.5% mothers were aware of the cash benefits. Similar study conducted in Jam Nagar, Gujarat[6] in 2013, with 400 participants, showed that 89.5% respondents were aware of the benefit schemes, whereas 105% were unaware about schemes. Another similar study conducted in Rohtak, Haryana[7] in 2012 with 148 study participants, showed 91.6% of the beneficiaries were aware of the schemes, whereas 22.3% of nonbeneficiaries were aware of schemes.

The knowledge about demand generation schemes in the present study was given by ASHA to 38.3% participants, by AWW to 23.3% participants, by multiple sources to 19.1% participants, by ANM to 11.7% participants, and by doctors to 7.6% participants. Another study conducted in Uttar Pradesh[4] in 2010 covering 4754 households spread over 12 districts, showed only 40% of women were contacted by ASHA who gave knowledge about demand generation schemes.


  Conclusion Top


The awareness about demand generation schemes is very high, which has successfully promoted women's preference to institutional deliveries. ASHA workers were the important link between the health sector and the community.

Financial support and sponsorship

Nil.

Conflicts of interest

There are no conflicts of interest.

 
  References Top

1.
Park K. Park′s Textbook of Preventive and Social Medicine. 23rd ed. Jabalpur: Banarsidas Bhanot Publishers; 2015. p. 520-92.  Back to cited text no. 1
    
2.
Millennium Development Goals India Country Report; 2011. Available from: http://www.mospi.nic.in. [Last accessed on 2015 Sep 13].  Back to cited text no. 2
    
3.
Priya N, Khan S, Khan Z. Determinants of utilization of Janani Suraksha Yojana among mothers in selected communities of Aligarh: A population-based cross-sectional study. Int J Sci Study 2016;4:97-102.  Back to cited text no. 3
    
4.
Khan ME, Hazra A, Bhatnagar I. Impact of Janani Suraksha Yojana on selected family health behaviors in rural Uttar Pradesh. J Fam Welf 2010;56:9-22.  Back to cited text no. 4
    
5.
Kumar R, Bachloo T, Bhardwaj A, Mukherjee A. Utilization and perception of health services under Janani Suraksha Yojana among mother in a rural area of Ambala district, Haryana. Int Med Sci Public Health 2016;5:1639-43.  Back to cited text no. 5
    
6.
Solanki HR, Shah HD, Parmar DV, Yadav SB. Assessment of Janani Suraksha Yojana in Jamnagar district. Indian J Respir Med 2013;2:99-102.  Back to cited text no. 6
    
7.
Sachdeva S, Malik JS. Assessment of maternal and child health (MCH) practices with a focus on Janani Suraksh Yojana (JSY). Global J Med Public Health 2012;1:1-9.  Back to cited text no. 7
    



 
 
    Tables

  [Table 1], [Table 2]



 

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