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 Table of Contents  
ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2014  |  Volume : 7  |  Issue : 1  |  Page : 52-54

A study to evaluate the effectiveness of street play on alcoholism among young adults residing in Shivapur village of a Handignur Primary Health Center, Belgaum


Department of Community Health Nursing, KLE University's Institute of Nursing Sciences, Belgaum, Karnataka, India

Date of Web Publication2-Jul-2014

Correspondence Address:
Shivraj R Dandagi
Lecturer, Department of Community Health Nursing, KLE University's Institute of Nursing Sciences, Belgaum, Karnataka
India
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/2349-5006.135093

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  Abstract 

An evaluative study was conducted on effectiveness of street play on alcoholism among 50 adolescents of Shivapur Village who were selected using simple random sampling technique.. A pre-experimental one-group pretest-posttest design was used. A structured knowledge questionnaire was used as a tool for data collection and the data were tabulated and analyzed according to the objectives of the study using descriptive and inferential statistics. Posttest scores compared with pretest scores showed an observable increase in the knowledge of young\ adults as majority 42 (84%) of them had high knowledge and remaining 8 (16%) had average knowledge and no single young adult remained in low knowledge category. There was no association between the knowledge of young adults on alcoholism with the selected demographic variables.

Keywords: Alcoholism, effectiveness, knowledge


How to cite this article:
Dandagi SR, Devulkar NM, Bevoor DD, Moreshwar SA. A study to evaluate the effectiveness of street play on alcoholism among young adults residing in Shivapur village of a Handignur Primary Health Center, Belgaum. Indian J Health Sci Biomed Res 2014;7:52-4

How to cite this URL:
Dandagi SR, Devulkar NM, Bevoor DD, Moreshwar SA. A study to evaluate the effectiveness of street play on alcoholism among young adults residing in Shivapur village of a Handignur Primary Health Center, Belgaum. Indian J Health Sci Biomed Res [serial online] 2014 [cited 2019 May 24];7:52-4. Available from: http://www.ijournalhs.org/text.asp?2014/7/1/52/135093


  Introduction Top


India is a land of many religions, cultures, and languages, but every religion advises followers to abandon intoxicants and to conquer depression by prayer. Why can't everyone be taught such moral values? [1]

Alcohol has been in common use since before records began. From the earliest time to the present, alcohol has played many crucial roles like thirst quencher for enhancing enjoyment and quality of life. [2] Hence, alcohol is used as a social lubricant and relaxation facilitator, which provides pharmacological pleasure, but when the same alcohol is misused, it turns into an evil, which is sufficiently inflammable to burn the families, society, and country. [3]

Historical view of alcohol in India shows that alcoholic beverages in the Indus Valley civilization appeared in the Chalcolithic Era. These beverages were in use between 3000 BC and 2000 BC "Sura," a beverage distilled from rice meal, was popular among the Kshatriya warriors and the peasant population. The Hindu Ayurvedic texts describe both the beneficent uses of alcoholic beverages and the consequences of intoxication and alcoholic diseases. [3]

According to tenth revision of the International Classification of Diseases-10 and Health problems. "Alcoholism is a cluster of physiological, behavioral and cognitive phenomena in which the use of alcohol takes on a much higher priority." Once people start drinking excessively, it becomes very difficult to stop it, while some researchers suggest that small amounts of alcohol, may have beneficial cardiovascular effects, but there is widespread agreement that heavy drinking can lead to severe health problems. [4]

According to the WHO, there are about two billion people worldwide who consume alcoholic beverages and 76.3 million with alcohol use disorder/alcoholism. From public health perspective, the global burden-related to alcohol use, both in terms of disease (morbidity) and death (mortality) is considerable in most parts of the world. Alcohol causes 1.8 million deaths (3.2% of total) and 58.3 million (4% of total) diseases. Unintentional injuries alone account for about one-third of the 1.8 million deaths, and the mental disorders account for 40% of the 53.8 million diseased conditions. [5]

Alcoholism is found to be a major factor for hindering the economical growth of the country. As per a study conducted in NIMHANS, Bangalore on "The social cost of alcoholism" revealed that, an average Indian individual earns a means of Rs. 1660.95, spends Rs. 1938.40/month on alcohol and incuses personal loans of Rs. 8388.29 and did not work for 13.52 days in a month. This leads to a loss of Rs. 1382.62/person/year, in terms of productivity. 18% lose jobs. 59.4% of families are supported by income from other family members and 9.7% send their children under 15 years to work in order to supplement family income. The state recovers Rs. 581.5 crores through taxation on alcohol and Rs. 1809 crores as individual health payments. It spends Rs. 1147.48 crores in hospital cost alone. [6]

There have been number of studies conducted on smaller populations in different regions of our country. Studies in Northern India found 25-40% of alcohol prevalence and in Southern India the prevalence of current alcohol use varies between 33% and 50% with higher prevalence among less educated and the poor. Mohan et al. (2001) conducted a survey in three districts (central, North and North-East India). They reported prevalence of current alcohol use of 38% in males and of 10% among females. A national house-hold survey was conducted in India for estimating the extent of substance dependence for alcohol and other drugs. It reported the current prevalence of alcohol use was 21.4%, cannabis 3%, heroin 0.2%, and other drugs 0.4-0.1%. [7]

Data from Karnataka shows a drop from mean of 28 years to 20 years of age, using alcohol. Alcohol sales have registered a steady growth rate of 7.8% in the years. The largest expansion is seen in Southern India, which has been driving most of the economic growth. [8]

A study conducted to assess the effectiveness of street play on alcoholism education for youth and adolescent in Jaipur, concluded that street play is an appropriate mode for education in the community. [9]


  Materials and Methods Top


A study was conducted on 50 adolescents in Shivapur village of Handignur Primary Health Center. A pre-experimental one-group pretest-posttest design was used to evaluate the effectiveness of street play on alcoholism. Simple random sampling technique was used to select the adolescents in Shivapur village of Handignur Primary Health Center.

A structured knowledge questionnaire was used as a tool for data collection and the data were tabulated and analyzed according to the objectives of the study using descriptive and inferential statistics.


  Results Top


The major findings of the study were as follows

  1. Findings related to demographic variables
    • Majority of the young adults were of the age group 20-25 years (52%), 25-30 years (28%), 30-35 years and 35-40 years (20%), respectively
    • 28% of the young adults were graduates, followed by the young adults who had their education up to diploma (12%), high school (30%), primary school (10%), pre-university (14%) and only 6% of the young adults were illiterates
    • 72% of the young adults were from joint families and remaining 28% were from nuclear families and no young adult in the sample was from extended family
    • 36% of the young adults were unemployed, 42% working as employee, 12% doing business and 10% working as coolie
    • 56% of the young adults had monthly family income between Rs. 1001/- and Rs. 3000/-, 20% had between Rs. 3001/- and Rs. 5000/, 18% had more than Rs. 5000/-and only 6% had less than Rs. 1000/-
    • 32% got information from newspaper/media, 42% got from health campaigns, 16% from family members and 10% from radio and relatives respectively
    • 58% of the young adults were alcoholic and remaining 42% said that they do not consume alcohol.
  2. Findings related to knowledge of young adults on alcoholism
    • The study findings revealed that in pretest majority 32 (64%) of the young adults had average knowledge and only 1 (2%) young adult scored enough to be considered to have high knowledge and remaining 17 (34%) of the young adults had low knowledge
    • Posttest scores compared with pretest scores showed an observable increase in the knowledge of young adults as majority 42 (84%) of them had high knowledge and remaining 8 (16%) had average knowledge and no single young adult remained in low knowledge category.



  Discussion Top


This study intended to find the knowledge of young adults on alcoholism. The findings of the study have been discussed with reference to the objectives and hypothesis.

The major findings of the study were as follows:

  1. Findings related to Demographic variables:
    • Majority of the young adults were of the age group 20-25 years (52%), 25-30 years (28%), 30-35 years and 35-40 years (20%) respectively
    • 28% of the young adults were graduates, followed by the young adults who had their education up to diploma (12%), high school (30%), primary school (10%), preuniversity (14%) and only 6% of the young adults were illiterates
    • 72% of the young adults were from joint families and remaining 28% were from nuclear families and no young adult in the sample was from extended family
    • 36% of the young adults were unemployed, 42% working as employee, 12% doing business and 10% working as coolie
    • 56% of the young adults had monthly Family income between Rs. 1001/- and Rs. 3000/-, 20% had between Rs. 3001/- and Rs. 5000/, 18% had more than Rs. 5000/-and only 6% had less than Rs. 1000/-
    • 32% got information from newspaper/media, 42% got from health campaigns, 16% from family members and 10% from radio and relatives respectively
    • 58% of the young adults were alcoholic and remaining 42% said that they do not consume alcohol.
  2. Findings related to knowledge of young adults on alcoholism:
    • The study findings revealed that in pretest majority 32 (64%) of the young adults had average knowledge and only 1 (2%) young adult scored enough to be considered to have high knowledge and remaining 17 (34%) of the young adults had low knowledge
    • Posttest scores compared with pretest scores showed an observable increase in the knowledge of young\ adults as majority 42 (84%) of them had high knowledge and remaining 8 (16%) had average knowledge and no single young adult remained in low knowledge category.
  3. Association between knowledge of young adults on alcoholism with selected demographic variables:
    • There was no association between the knowledge of young adults on alcoholism with the selected demographic variables.



  Conclusion Top


Exposure to street play increased knowledge of young adults regarding alcoholism. Hence, the street play was effective in improving the knowledge of young adults.

There was no association found between the pretest knowledge score of the young adults and variables such as educational status, type of family, age, occupation, family monthly income, source of information regarding alcoholism, and habit of drinking alcohol.

 
  References Top

1.Shah CN. Fighting alcoholism. Reader's Digest; 2007 Sept, 15.  Back to cited text no. 1
    
2.Effects of alcohol on human body. Available from: http://www.buzzle.com.[Last accessed on 2004].  Back to cited text no. 2
    
3.History of alcoholism in India. Available from: http://www.medline.com. [Last accessed on 2010].  Back to cited text no. 3
    
4.American Psychological Association. Understanding the use, disorder and treatment of alcohol. APA Help Center, 2003: "http://www.med.unc.edu/" www.med.unc.edu alcohol/welcom.htm 2004; 38:613-9.   Back to cited text no. 4
    
5.Mayo Clin. How serious is Alcoholism. Reuters Health. 2001; "http://www.reutershealth.com./" www.reutershealth.com. [Last accessed on 2008 Jul].  Back to cited text no. 5
    
6.Vivek Benegal. The social cost of Alcoholism. NIMHANS Journal. 2000 "http://www.nimhans.kar.nic.in/" www.nimhans.kar.nic.in 2000; 42:14-20.  Back to cited text no. 6
    
7.Chavan S, Arun Priti, Bhargava Rachna, Singh Pal Gurvinder. Prevalence of Alcohol and Drug Dependence in Rural and Slum Population of Chandigarh: A Community Survey. Indian Journal of Psychiatry 2007 March; 49:44-47.  Back to cited text no. 7
    
8.Vivek Benegal. India; Alcohol and Public Health. Indian J Community Med. Apr 2010; 35:238-244.  Back to cited text no. 8
    
9.Madhav P, Ramesh A, Munshi R, Gopinath HS, Joshi U, Veeresh R, et al. An interactive approach to Alcoholism education for youth and adolescents. Int Conf AIDS 2002;7-12:14.  Back to cited text no. 9
    




 

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Abstract
Introduction
Materials and Me...
Results
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